Drive Shaft Spacers for Toyota and Ford Vehicles

4Crawler Offroad Products

Fits many Pickup, 4Runner, Tacoma, Tundra, Landcruiser models

also may fit Mitsubishi Montero, Pajero, MityMax and Dodge D50 pickups.

And now available for the Ford 8.8" (9") and other flanges

a division of Visual Diagnostics LLC

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Contents:

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Introduction:

On the Toyota 4WD Pickup, 4Runner and Land Cruiser model, the front and rear drive shaft bolt to "companion" flanges on the transfer case with a mating flange on the drive shaft (Propeller Shaft in "Toyota-speak"). On the 2WD pickups, the drive shaft typically slides into a slip yoke output on the transmission and bolts to the rear differential with a flange. Up until now, the only way to make a drive shaft longer was to remove it and have a drive line shop cut the existing tubing off the drive shaft and weld on a new length of tubing. If you needed a significant change in length, this was not so bad to do. But often, you only needed to lengthen the shaft a small amount, from 3/4" to 1-1/2" for example. Since you had pay for a whole new length of drive shaft tubing (plus the labor to install it) and not just the additional inch or so of additional tubing, it could cost hundreds of dollars to have a shaft lengthened, even a short amount. On the other hand, shortening a shaft is typically less expensive, since you can simply separate one end from the shaft tubing, cut the remaining shaft down and re-weld the end back on.

What are some indications that your drive shaft is too short?

Ideally, you only want just a little more slip yoke compression travel than needed by the change in drive shaft length as the suspension fully compresses. How much is that? It is hard to give an exact answer, as every vehicle is different. Generally a rear drive shaft needs less slip yoke travel than a front drive shaft. A longer drive shaft generally needs less slip yoke travel than a shorter one. A drive shaft that is at a flatter angle will generally need less travel than one at a steeper angle.

How much spacer do I need?

So how do you determine how much slip yoke travel you need on your vehicle?

Generally having too much slip yoke compression travel is better than not enough. Whatever you do, you do not want the drive shaft to "bottom out", as that can cause severe damage to the transfer case, as it will take the brunt of the impact should the slip yoke compress fully. But if you have so much slip yoke pull apart that it separates or vibrates is no good either.

There is one situation where a drive shaft spacer may not be an option and that is where a short drive shaft is already running at an extreme angle and/or the joints are near their maximum operating angle. Since installing a spacer effectively shortens the distance between the ends of the shaft (that is how the spacer makes a too short shaft fit), it also will make the angles increase. Normally this is not a big issue on a longer shaft, but on a short shaft where you are already running at the maximum joint angles, the angle change of the spacer may be too much to accommodate. In this case physically lengthening the shaft is the better, albeit more expensive, option.

Until now there has only been one solution, that is to have the shaft physically lengthened at considerable expense. But now available for the Toyota 2WD and 4WD pickup, 4Runner, Tacoma and FJ-series Landcruiser models are some simple bolt-on spacers that fit many of the common drive shaft bolt patterns and typical applications listed below. The bolt pattern dimensions are illustrated in this sketch. The three dimensions you'll need to determine the bolt pattern are labeled "X", "Y", and "Z". X and Y represent the center-center spacing of the pattern on each side while Z is the size of the bolt that goes through the flange, typically 8mm, 10mm or 11mm. Note that the actual holes in the flange are typically slightly oversized, so if you measure 10.2mm hole diameter, that implies a 10mm bolt.

Drive shaft flange sketch

Toyota Companion Flange Dimensions:

Bolt Pattern/Metric Bolt Size Bolt Pattern/SAE
(approx.)
Typical Application
60mm x 60mm 8mm 2-23/64" x 2-23/64 1979-1983 U-Joint*
56mm x 64mm 8mm 2-13/64" x 2-33/64" 1979 - 1983 U-Joint**
56mm x 64mm 10mm 2-13/64" x 2-33/64" NEW: FJ-40 Landcruiser****
60mm x 60mm 10mm 2-23/64" x 2-23/64" 1984-1995 U-Joint
also FJ-80/LX-450 front
60mm x 68.5mm 10mm 2-23/64" x 2-23/64" 1984-1995 CV Joint/4cyl
61.5mm x 70mm 10mm 2-27/64" x 2-45/64" 1988-1995 CV Joint/V6
also: FJ-60
65mm x 65mm 10mm 2-9/16" x 2-9/16" 1995.5-200x Tacoma CV
1996-200x 4Runner CV
2005+ Tacoma 2WD pinion flange
Tundra 2WD pinion flange***
66mm x 66mm 11mm 2-19/32" x 2-19/32" FJ60 differential flange *****
Tacoma/Tundra
77mm x 77mm 11mm 3-1/32" x 3-1/32" Tundra *****
77mm x 77mm 11mm 3-15/32" x 3-15/32" Tundra *****

Ford Pinion Flange Dimensions:

Bolt Pattern Bolt Size Typical Application
2.5" x 2.5"
3.25" BCD
12mm Passenger Cars
3.0" x 3.0"
4.5" BCD
12mm F-150 and up pickups
Explorer
Mustang

The spacers are machined from billet T-6061 aluminum and are 107.5mm or 127mm in diameter (does not need to match the outer diameter of the transfer case or pinion flange exactly) and include 4 - 8mm, 10 mm or 11mm metric grade 12.9 mounting bolts and class 10 lock nuts to replace the stock mounting bolts. These spacers may fit other Toyota drive shaft flanges and feature a male locating ring on one side (3mm high) and a corresponding female recess (4.5mm deep) on the back side (both approx. 46mm in diameter) to fit the corresponding ring and recess on the stock drive shaft and companion flanges. To check what drive shaft flange bolt hole spacing will work on your truck, measure the center-center bolt hole spacing and compare to the above dimensions and see if you match up with one of the above bolt hole patterns,

When measuring the bolt hole patterns, it might help to imagine a square (or rectangle) formed by the 4 bolt holes in the flange. The corners of the square (or rectangle) will fall upon the center of the bolt holes and it is the width (and length) of that square (or rectangle) that define the bolt hole pattern. For example, if you drew a 60mm x 60mm square then drilled a hole at each corner of that square, you would end up with a 60mm x 60mm bolt hole pattern. This is contrasted to a Bolt Circle Diameter (BCD) measurement which is commonly used on measuring wheel stud locations. For example, a Toyota 6-lug wheel BCD is 6 on 5.5", meaning 6 holes equally spaced around a 5.5" diameter circle. The problem with BCD is that it assumes the bolt holes are equally spaced and while it would work with the square bolt patterns, it does not work for the rectangular patterns as you can't specify where the bolt holes are located along the bolt circle.

Notes:

What makes the 4Crawler Offroad spacers different?

So, what makes these spacers different? Well, we were one of the first companies offering a Toyota-specific drive shaft spacer. In designing our spacers, we studied the market and picked the most popular set of drive shaft flange bolt patterns to support. As such, we offer the widest variety of patterns and spacer sizes available on the market. We also offer blank, un-drilled spacers for those cases where you may have a unique pattern or application. And over the years, we have increased our product offering by adding the newer 65mm x 65mm pattern as well as the older 56mm x 64mm pattern to support those applications as well.

Also, we only use real metric bolts, unlike some of the other spacers out there, which use undersized SAE hardware. Also, we use grade 12.9 hardware, meeting or exceeding the specs. of the factory grade 11 hardware. And also, we list the exact bolt patterns of each of the spacers, so you can check which one meets your needs before you order. Since there is such a wide range of bolt patterns that have been used over the years on a wide variety of vehicles, it is hard to list a spacer that fits any given year/model vehicle. Also, with the popularity and ease of swapping parts from one vehicle to another, you may have a 'XX 4Runner with a transfer case from a 'YY pickup and a drive shaft from a 'ZZ Tacoma, and deciding what "year" your vehicle is for purposes of selecting a spacer for is pointless.

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On-Line Ordering:

Order a drive shaft spacer below:

In-stock spacers (as listed below), typically ship within 24 hours via USPS Priority Mail, typical delivery time as noted:

Want the spacers shipped faster?

Express Delivery upgrade; US$15.00 for US shipments Express Delivery upgrade; US$27.00 for international shipments

8mm hardware options:

Add 8mm nut/bolt upgrade to spacer order Add 8mm hardware+sleeves to existing spacer order

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Triple-drilled spacers:

The triple-drilled spacers provide 3 popular flange bolt hole patterns in a single spacer. This is an advantage in that many vehicles that use any of these 3 bolt hole patterns often use one or more of the other patterns as well. We have had customers who intended to install a spacer on one drive shaft flange but for one reason or another, had to move the spacer to another flange with a different pattern. By having multiple patterns in one spacer, you can usually make that swap without having to exchange one pattern spacer for another. And to be clear, this spacer will fit any one of the 3 patterns listed above at one time. One pattern is drilled at a 0 degree offset. The second pattern is rotated approximately 30 degrees from the first pattern and likewise, the third pattern is offset approximately 60 degrees.

0.75" Driveshaft Spacer 1.00" Driveshaft Spacer 1.25" Driveshaft Spacer 1.50" Driveshaft Spacer
0.75" Spacer 1.00" Spacer 1.25" Spacer 1.50" Spacer


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


International Delivery;
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured

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65mmx65mm drilled spacers:

Also fits 60mm x 60mm bolt pattern via elongated holes.

0.75" Driveshaft Spacer 1.00" Driveshaft Spacer 1.25" Driveshaft Spacer 1.50" Driveshaft Spacer
0.75" Spacer/65mm; US$65.00 1.00" Spacer/65mm; US$68.00 1.25" Spacer/65mm; US$71.00 1.50" Spacer/65mm; US$74.00


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured

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56mmx64mm drilled spacers:

0.75" Driveshaft Spacer 1.00" Driveshaft Spacer 1.25" Driveshaft Spacer 1.50" Driveshaft Spacer
0.75" Spacer/56mm x 64mm; US$65.00 1.00" Spacer/56mm x 64mm; US$68.00 1.25" Spacer/56mm x 64mm; US$71.00 1.50" Spacer/56mm x 64mm; US$74.00


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery;
- not insured

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Un-drilled 4.25" dia. spacers:

These spacers are the perfect solution for a custom application, you can drill them to match your driveshaft flange. Also as another option, you can use these spacers to make a bolt pattern conversion by drilling and tapping bolt holes in one side for one pattern and then offsetting and drilling/tapping a 2nd set of holes for a 2nd bolt pattern on the opposite side. You could also install threaded studs in place of bolts if that suits your application.

Un-drilled spacers will come with 10mm metric hardware unless otherwise specified.

0.75" Driveshaft Spacer 1.00" Driveshaft Spacer 1.25" Driveshaft Spacer 1.50" Driveshaft Spacer
0.75" Spacer/un-drilled; US$65.00 1.00" Spacer/un-drilled; US$68.00 1.25" Spacer/un-drilled; US$71.00 1.50" Spacer/un-drilled; US$74.00


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured


International Delivery
- not insured

Notes:

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11mm bolt - 66mm x 66mm and 77mm x 77mm spacers:

These spacers are larger in diameter to fit the larger bolt patterns (i.e. 2 sets of holes 66mm x 66mm and 77mm x 77mm)and also have the larger 11mm holes and hardware.

11mm bolt spacer 1.00" Driveshaft Spacer 1.25" Driveshaft Spacer 1.50" Driveshaft Spacer
0.75" 11mm Spacer; US$75.00 1.00" 11mm Spacer; US$78.00 1.25" 11mm Spacer; US$81.00 1.50" 11mm Spacer; US$84.00


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery

Notes:

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11mm bolt - 66mm x 66mm, 77mm x 77mm and 88mm x 88mm spacers:

For the largest 88xmm x 88mm bolt pattern, we can slot out the 77mm x 77mm bolt holes to accommodate the 88mm x 88mm bolt pattern. The 11mm bolts will end up near the outer edge of the spacer in this configuration. We modify these spacers to order (*), so expect a few days to a week delay in shipment to allow for this custom machining.

88mm x 88mm spacer 88mm x 88mm spacer 88mm x 88mm spacer 88mm x 88mm spacer
0.75" 88mm x 88mm Spacer Modification; US$105.00 1.00" 88mm x 88mm Spacer Modification; US$108.00 1.25" 88mm x 88mm Spacer Modification; US$111.00 1.50" 88mm x 88mm Spacer Modification; US1$114.00


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery

Notes:

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Ford 8.8" Spacers:

Now available for the Ford 8.8" and other pinion flanges with the 2" diameter pilot bore and the following bolt hole patterns:

Spacers include new Class 12.9 M12 12-point bolts and spacers in 0.75", 1.0", 1.25" or 1.5" sizes in a billtet T-6061 aluminum material.

Ford 8.8 Spacer, Flange and u-joint yoke Ford 8,8 spacer installed
Ford 8.8" Spacer, Flange and u-joint yoke Ford 8.8" spacer installed

Ford 8.8 Spacer Ford 8.8 Spacer Ford 8.8 Spacer Ford 8.8 Spacer
0.75" Ford 8.8" Spacer: US$85.00 1.00" Ford 8.8" Spacer: US$90.00 1.25" Ford 8.8" Spacer: US$95.00 1.50" Ford 8.8" Spacer: US$100.00


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery


US Delivery
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International Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery


International Delivery

Notes:

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Returns/Exchanges Policy:

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Installation Instructions:

Installed spacer
Installed spacer on transfer case
output flange

Allow approximately 30 minutes for the installation, assuming you don't run into any rusted or damaged fasteners. To remove the stock hardware, you'll need a pair of 14mm wrenches and to install the spacer 10mm hardware, you'll need an 8mm long arm allen key and a 17mm wrench.

While you should not have to separate the drive shaft to install the spacer, it is a good idea to put an alignment mark across both sides of the slip yoke. Some white paint works well and will help you re-align the slip yoke if you accidentally pull it apart.

Typically, the stock drive shaft (a.k.a. propeller shaft) flange bolts use a 14mm head, so you'll need a pair of 14mm combination wrenches to remove those. For the rear drive shaft, block the vehicle's tires or place the rear axle on jack stands for easier removal. You can place the transmission in neutral and release the parking brake if needed.

The spacers can be installed on either the upper or lower end of the drive shaft, depending on application and bolt hole patterns. On 4WD trucks, they are typically installed at the transfer case companion flange. 2WD trucks will only be able to install them at the pinion flange on the axle, but no reason 4WD trucks can't do the same. And it would not be out of the question to install two spacers on one drive shaft if you need to extend it more than 1.5", putting one spacer on each end of the shaft.

Break the stock flange bolts loose at the transfer case and then remove them. Support the drive shaft before removing the last bolt to keep it from falling. Then compress the slip yoke enough to allow insertion of the spacer.

Note:
Some companion (transfer case or differential/pinion) flanges have pressed in studs instead of separate bolts. In this case, you'll need to hammer or press the studs out. You can spin a nut on the end of the stud before hammering it out to protect the threads. The supplied longer bolts will replace the studs.

Then slip the spacer in between the transfer case output flange and the drive shaft flange and turn it to make sure you have the proper set of 4 bolt holes in alignment. Slip in one of the supplied metric socket head cab screws, a lock nut and washer (if needed). Repeat for the other 3 bolt holes, just to make sure all 4 bolts are installed before tightening them. If you find the bolts hard to install, use a small round file to clean out the insides of the holes in the flanges to make installation easier.

For un-drilled spacers, you'll want to use the existing flange to mark the spacer for the location of the new bolt holes. The spacer can be clamped to either the drive shaft or transfer case flange, probably easiest to remove the flange from the transfer case output (30mm staked nut holds it in place) and use that, clamping it to the spacer so it does not move. Select a drill bit that just fits inside the bolt hole or use a transfer punch to mark the hole locations. If you are unsure of your drilling skills, you may elect to mark and drill one hole at a time and then use that freshly drilled hole and a bolt to secure the spacer to the flange for marking and drilling the next hole. Once the hole location is marked, remove the flange and drill out that hole (a drill press works best to ensure a straight hole). Use a bit that is as big as or slightly larger than the hole in the flange. Once all 4 holes are drilled, make sure all 4 bolts fit into the flange, spacer and drive shaft before proceeding. If you find a slight misalignment, you can run your drill bit through the holes to open them up a little bit if needed. For the standard 10mm bolts, you generally want to drill the holes with a 10.5mm bit or a 13/32" or 27/64" drill bit.

Once all 4 bolts are in place, alternately snug them down in a criss-cross pattern.

Once all 4 nuts are snugged down, torque the nuts to the factory specifications listed in the Factory Service Manual. Lacking that information, you can use approx. 40-45 ft.lbs. (10mm) or 50-60 ft.lbs. (11mm hardware). Be sure to re-check the torque after 50-100 miles of driving. While nylon lock nuts are used with the spacers, you might get a flake of paint or dirt between the shaft and spacer during installation and the bolts will feel tight at that point. But after a while driving, that flake will get crushed and fall apart leaving a tiny gap that can lead to looseness.

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email: sales@4Crawler.com

Visitor # 53679 since 05.MAR.2008

[Last updated: 13.December.2017]

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